Fairyocious

Fairyocious

Sat Feb 26, 2022 – 12:00 pm | Visit Beloit
Fri Mar 4, 2022 – 5:00 pm | Bagels & More

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Fairyocious

Directed by Fabien Ara
Narrative Short
France | 13 min | 2019


SIMON : ”I want to be a girl, mommy.” Alma freezes. She doesn’t know how to react: from now on, her 8-year-old son wants to dress up like a fairy to go to school. She asks for help from her neighbors. Soon the whole building is debating on Simon’s choice for gender orientation.



“Excuse Me, Miss, Miss, Miss” is the story of the common Filipino. He or she wakes up every day at 4 AM, waits in queues for 2 hours just to ride the metro, works for 12 hours, waits in queues for another 2 hours just to ride the metro to go home, get a decent sleep for 4 hours, and wakes up at 4 AM again to continue with the monotony of their lives for 6 months. Six months, because most of these workers are only under contract for a short period. This practice is called “endo” or short for end-of-contract. Big companies hire workers only for six months so they cannot be forced to regularize them, and that means only paying these workers the very minimum wage. This also means big savings for the company while leaving these workers struggling again to find another job.

With this ordeal, one really sometimes ask: when will this agony end? How can you prove the gods that you are worth keeping in their companies? This film might have the answer but its absurdity is disheartening.

Fairyocious - Poster

Fairyocious - Fabien AraFabien Ara
Director
Fabien Ara is a French actor, born May 9, 1987, in Aix en Provence. He made his television debut with the short film “Coloc-Scopie”, by Sébastien Douaud, for the ARTE program “To be 20 years old in 2008”, before being discovered by Laurent Bouhnik for the role of Alex in his long feature film “Desire”.

Fabien continued his work for television with the comedic role of JB, a student, in the TV show “Friend Zone”, directed by Stephan Kopecky, where he played next to Baptiste Lecaplain, and Audrey Giacomini.

In 2010, Fabien appeared in the film “Borderline”, by Alexandre Coffre with Francois Damiens and Pascale Arbillot. Then in 2011, Fabien was Fukushiman in the TV show “Fukushiman”, directed by Rémy Dish for Canal+. He also played the role of Jim Morrison in the short film “Mr.Mojo” by Fred Vallet, as well as the role of Teddy in the medium-length film “Le Jardin des Eden” by Sébastien Ors, starring Robin Renucci.

In 2012, he played Gilles Lelouche’s brother-in-law in Valerie Lemercier’s “100% Cachemire”. In addition, he was also performing in theaters and received an award for best Actor in a leading role at the Bougival Theater Festival for the character of Alan Strang in “Equus” written by Peter Shaffer with the company “Grains de Scènes”.

In 2013, Fabien was one of the lead roles in Benoit Danguin’s “Le Complexe du Homard” where he played Yoda, a disabled young man. That same year, he also joined the cast of “Super Z” by Julien de Volte and Arnaud Tabarly, with the lead role of Yvon.

In 2014, Fabien was the lead role in the Philippian feature film “4.08” directed by Pedring Lopez.

In 2015 and 2016, he played in the German long featured film “Liebmann”, directed by Jules Hermann, selected for the 2016 Berlinale. “Liebmann” was also one of the finalists for the “2016 Teddy Awards” in the category “Best Feature Film”. The film has also been nominated at the “European Flim Award” for the European Discovery of the year. He played as well in the French-Chinese short film “French Touch” directed by Xiaoxing Cheng. With this performance, he earned two awards for “Best Actor” : one at the “2015 Chelsea Film Festival” in New York and the other, at the “2015 Paris Courts Devant Festival”. Then, he played the role of Julien in the first long feature of Harry Roselmack and had the main role in the first long featured film of Julien Botzanowski. He also played the role of Paul in season 4 of the TV show “Working Girls” and portrayed the role of Simon in the feature film “Tourmentée” d’Elisabeth Tcha. More recently, he was Dion in “Is This Now”, an English production.

In 2017, Fabien directed his first short film “Clac”, as the laureate of the “Nouveaux Cinemas” competition. He also played the role of Frederic Joncquart in “Les Tuche 3”.

Film Information


Director: Fabien Ara
Country: France
Year: 2019
Language: French
Runtime: 13 min.
Rated: G

Credits


Writer: Fabien Ara
Producer: Amélie Quéret
Cinematography: Thomas Jacquet
Editor: Emilie Janin
Music: Sylvain Morizet

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Principal Cast

From Trash to Treasure

From Trash to Treasure

Sat Feb 26, 2022 – 12:00 pm | Visit Beloit
Fri Mar 4, 2022 – 5:00 pm | Bagels & More

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Purchase your ticket either online or at the Box Office



From Trash to Treasure: Turning Negatives Into Positives in Lesotho

Directed by Iara Lee
Documentary Short
USA | 25 min | 2020


From erosion to overgrazing to enduring poverty, the people of Lesotho—a highland country surrounded by South Africa—face a variety of difficult challenges. Yet grassroots communities in the country also exhibit tremendous resourcefulness and creativity. In particular, a wealth of artists have mastered a talent for resurrection, developing the skill to creatively turn negatives into positives: Designers who turn discarded trash into beautiful jewelry, clothes, rugs. Filmmakers who turn tragedy into artistic expressions of resilience and compassion. Musicians who write songs to save the environment. In this short, Cultures of Resistance Films profiles a variety of these inventive creators, introducing viewers to a fascinating cast of local residents who are using art as a means of communicating a communal desire for positive change.



The writer and producer, Rosa SanMarchi, approached us out of the blue (digitally) to direct this film after a recommendation from a friend. Immediately after reading the script we knew it was something we wanted to work on. It was a thrilling experience to collaborate with someone new, who already had a vision for the film but was looking for other voices and opinions to bring it home. The collaborative spirit of our team really reflected what we were trying to convey on screen, that we are all better when we listen to one another.

From Trash to Treasure - Poster

From Trash to Treasure - Iara LeeIara Lee
Director

Iara lee, a Brazilian of Korean descent, is an activist, filmmaker, and founder/director of the Cultures of Resistance Network, an organization that promotes global solidarity and connects and supports agitators, educators, farmers, and artists to build a more just and peaceful world through creative resistance and nonviolent action.

Film Information


Director: Iara Lee
Country: USA
Year: 2020
Language: English
Runtime: 25 min.
Rated:  G

Credits


Producer  Iara Lee
Cinematography: Dimo Petkov
Editor:
Dimo Petkov

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Myrtle

Myrtle

Sat Feb 26, 2022 – 12:00 pm | Visit Beloit
Fri Mar 4, 2022 – 5:00 pm | Bagels & More

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Myrtle

Directed by Patricia McCormack
Narrative Short
United Kingdom | 16 min | 2021


Myrtle, a trailer park Mom from Indiana, cooks dinner for her son. But something’s not quite right. This kitchen is anonymous, industrial, and Myrtle’s working to a deadline. As her composure unravels, we realize that 21 grams is all that separates life from death.



MYRTLE is an adaptation of a play that Megan Barker and I worked on. I broached the idea of developing it into a film as I loved the premise and thought it had real dramatic potential. We felt it important to keep the audience in the dark initially, as to where we are and why Myrtle is preparing this meal, in order for the final moments to (hopefully) have a stronger impact. It was essential for the kitchen to be as much of a character in the film, cold and intimidating as this adds to Myrtle’s disorientation. There is a back story weaved in, the memory of a murder, the intention being to write a feature film, where we will revisit the clues in MYRTLE and reveal what actually took place.

To me, Myrtle is a character that asks for love and understanding, possibly in spite of herself and I like people like that, my hope with this film is that the audience will have compassion for her in the end. The main themes being, the brutalising effect of poverty, the deprivation of choice and a mother’s unconditional love.

Myrtle

Myrtle - Patricia McCormackPatricia McCormack
Director

Patricia was born and raised in Glasgow, Scotland and trained as an Actress at Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh. Previous acting credits include ‘Pit’ at The Traverse Theatre, ‘Lost At Sea’ Finborough Theatre, The Field Of Blood 2 (BBC1), River City (BBC Scotland). She has featured in several Afternoon Play’s on BBC Radio 4 and appeared in long-running series McLevy starring Brian Cox. She is also an accomplished voice-over artist. For the last few years, she has worked in Advertising, whilst developing several film projects. This is Patricia’s directorial debut.

Film Information


Director: Patricia McCormack
Country: United Kingdom
Year: 2021
Language: English
Runtime: 16 min.
Rated: PG-13

Credits


Writer: Megan Barker
Producer: Shaheen Schleifer, Patricia McCormack
Music:Scott Twynholm
Editor: Heidi Freeman
Cinematography: Edmund Curtis

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Principal Cast

The Roads Most Traveled

Roads Most Traveled, The

Sat Feb 26, 2022 – 12:00 pm | Visit Beloit
Fri Mar 4, 2022 – 5:00 pm | Bagels & More

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The Roads Most Traveled: Photojournalist Don Bartletti

Directed by Bill Wisneski
Documentary Short
USA | 25 min | 2020


Pulitzer prize-winning photojournalist Don Bartletti shares heart wrenching stories from his forty-year career documenting history as it unfolds.

Internationally recognized for his commitment to photographing the migration of Central Americans to the United States, Bartletti’s images reveal the never-ending saga of illegal immigration by individuals desperate to improve their lives.



Growing up in an immigrant family in a working-class neighborhood in Chicago, I remember how alienated I felt watching the sitcoms and films of the 80s. I was more likely to (and in fact did) see a cat-eating, wise-cracking alien on television than a family of manual workers shopping for appliances at flea markets, or multiple generations in a household.

When I was in high school in the early 90s, I picked up a comic book by a woman named Heather McAdams and it felt like a veil had been lifted. She was funny, weird, gross, horny, and awkward. All traits I could recognize in myself and my friends. All traits that were absent in the beautiful, perfect, smooth-haired girls I saw on screen with psychiatrist dads and homemaker moms.

Since then, I’ve thought a lot about who “gets” to write, tell, and show their stories, and what it means for our culture when those stories come from a limited point of view. In the United States, our stories are among our greatest exports, viewed by audiences around the world. The stories we tell and share shape how humanity sees itself, its past and its future.

For me, independent comics have been a place where all the usual gatekeepers are absent. Agents, editors, distributors, and funders don’t need to sign-off on, accept, review, or otherwise bless the fantastic worlds drawn on a legal pad during the downtime of an artists’ daily hustle. Copy machines and social media are all that’s needed to transport readers into a variety of lived experiences that Hollywood and major publishers overlook as unprofitable.

In 2010, I wrote and published my own independent comic. It did well, it sold at comics conventions and was nominated for a few awards. Beyond that, the comic shared parts of myself, my values, anxieties, beliefs in a way that nothing else has. It was clarifying for me and allowed for connections I had not expected, including conversations with men who bought the comic and confessed to me this was the first story they had ever read with a female protagonist and their surprise that they could find a woman’s experiences to be relatable to their own.

This is the magic of independent comics: anyone can tell their story and they are so cheap and accessible, that you never know who is going to end up reading it, and in turn, understanding your world. Independent comics allow artists direct access to an audience that is hungry for something new, different, real, and raw.

And this is resonating beyond niche audiences.

Indie comics have become Oscar-winning films and genre-defying hit series on Netflix. I’m convinced that if you want to see the stories, we’ll all be talking about in 2025 and beyond, you can start now by meeting the independent comics creators of today

That’s why I want to take you to the Small Press Expo, a beloved annual event, where we can meet the people that are putting ourselves in stories.

The Roads Most Traveled - Poster

The Roads Most Traveled - Bill Wisneski Bill Wisneski
Director

Bill Wisneski is an award-winning documentary director, producer, writer, and cinematographer. He has received twenty-four Pacific Southwest Emmy Awards and dozens of other national accolades for his compelling films. His documentaries have been broadcast nationally on PBS and they’ve screened at more than one hundred film festivals throughout the world.

Film Information


Director: Bill Wisneski
Country: USA
Year: 2020
Language: English
Runtime: 25 min.
Rated:  PG

Credits


Producer: Bill Wisneski
Cinematography: Bill Wisneski
Editor: Chad Richmond, Chris Garis

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Whales Don't Swim

Whales Don’t Swim

Sat Feb 26, 2022 – 12:00 pm | Visit Beloit
Fri Mar 4, 2022 – 5:00 pm | Bagels & More

NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD AT THE VENUES
Purchase your ticket either online or at the Box Office



Whales Don’t Swim

Directed by Matthieu Ruyssen
Narrative Short
France | 22 min | 2020


Yves is the sole target of his bullying classmates. His only refuge is in synchronized swimming, which he practices nightly in secret. But when Charlotte, a fellow classmate and member of the team spies him at the pool, he will no longer be able to hide…



The writer and producer, Rosa SanMarchi, approached us out of the blue (digitally) to direct this film after a recommendation from a friend. Immediately after reading the script we knew it was something we wanted to work on. It was a thrilling experience to collaborate with someone new, who already had a vision for the film but was looking for other voices and opinions to bring it home. The collaborative spirit of our team really reflected what we were trying to convey on screen, that we are all better when we listen to one another.

Whales Don't Swim - Poster

Whales Don't Swim - Matthieu RuyssenMatthieu Ruyssen
Director

Matthieu Ruyssen was born in January 1987 in the South of France. He grew up in central France and near Paris.
Following Japanese language and culture studies, he became an editor for television and cinema, which is absolutely unrelated. He decided to write and direct when he realized that life is too short. Whales don’t swim is his first short-movie, produced by Wrong Films. They are developing together his second short-film, Big Sun.
Matthieu lives with his wife and their dog Zola in Paris, but he hopes to soon leave the city.

Film Information


Director: Matthieu Ruyssen
Country: France
Year: 2020
Language: French
Runtime: 22 min.
Rated: 

Credits


Writer: Matthieu Ruyssen
Producer: Thomas Carillon
Cinematography: Lucie Baudinaud
Music: Julie Roué
Editor: Marylou Vergez
Key Cast: Martin Daquin, Juliette Février, Roxane Perret

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Principal Cast