Dear Frankie

Dear Frankie

WI / IL Shorts 3


Sat Feb 22, 2020 – 7:30 pm | Hendricks Arts Center
Sun Feb 23, 2020 – 12:00 pm | Hendricks Arts Center



Dear Frankie

Directed by Megan Marie Connolly, Claudia Krogmeier
Narrative Short
USA | 4 min | 2018


On a young woman’s journey to heal she must relive her past and face her conflicting feelings towards her unstable friend.



Megan Marie Connolly and Claudia Krogmeier brought their individual styles to the table and blended them to make “Dear Frankie.” Megan Marie seeks to make audiences slightly uncomfortable in her emotional dramas that are never as simple as black or white. Claudia’s unique and experimental tastes help to push her projects to new heights. “Dear Frankie” was originally written as a domestic dispute culminating in a violent encounter between two women in their home, involving long takes and characters frozen in place. With Megan Marie’s personal experience on the subject matter, the film came together as a heartfelt piece about a corroded friendship and the halting nature of healing and acceptance. The global super 8 competition Straight 8 provided an excellent opportunity to bring this story to life through film, and a way in which to grow stronger in the art of pre-production and purposeful pacing of our story. Straight 8 challenges filmmakers to tell a story on a single cartridge of super 8 with no editing and no post production. After this challenging exercise, in which we were honored as Straight 8 finalists at the 71st Cannes Film Festival, we found that this personal, unique story had an extraordinary impact on audiences. Audiences can watch this film ten times and still learn something new during each screening. We decided to tweak the film to our liking and edited, colored, and sound designed our film. We are so excited to share this final, completed version of “Dear Frankie” for the first time with audiences worldwide.

Dear Frankie - Poster

Dear Frankie - Megan Marie Connelly

Megan Marie Connelly

Dear Frankie - Claudia Krogmeier

Claudia Krogmeier

Megan Marie Connolly, Claudia Krogmeier
Director

Born and raised in Chicago, Megan Marie graduated from Northwestern University with a BFA in Television and Film. She is an editor/assistant editor and works on everything from commercials to independent films. Cuban and fluent in Spanish, she especially enjoys working on Spanish-speaking spots and films. Megan Marie also has an extensive background in production and works on set as well as writes and directs her own independent shorts.

Videographer, editor, and virtual reality researcher, Claudia especially enjoys when she can write/direct surrealist and experimental short films and music videos. Thanks to several great adventures, she has recently filmed in Haiti and Kenya, and loves working with passionate, creative people. A native of West Lafayette, Indiana, Claudia is a graduate of Indiana University and is currently pursuing her masters degree at Purdue University.

Film Information


Director: Megan Marie Connolly, Claudia Krogmeier
Country: USA
Language: English
Runtime: 4 min.
Rated: PG

Credits


Producer: Nate Gilbert, Megan Marie Connolly
Writer: Megan Marie Connolly, Claudia Krogmeier
Director of Photography: Mark Charles Davis
Composer: Darrell M. Hunt
Editor: Megan Marie Connolly

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Principal Cast

Engage Earth - James Choi

Engage Earth

WI / IL Short Slot 3


YES! Filmmaker(s) Attending for Q & A


Sat Feb 22, 2020 – 7:30 pm | Hendricks Arts Center
Sun Feb 23, 2020 – 12:00 pm | Hendricks Arts Center



Engage Earth

Directed by James Choi
Documentary Short
USA | 16 min | 2019


A look inside Brazilian artist, Denise Milan and her long ongoing work with stones leading to an impactful art program in Heliópolis, one of the largest favelas in the Americas located outside of Sao Paulo.



Our personal connection to planet Earth is vital to our future as inhabitants of this big blue stone. Denise Milan’s work with stones serves as a great reminder of this important message and what can come from understanding this connection. EVERYONE has a story with the stones.

Engage Earth - Poster

Engage Earth - James ChoiJames Choi
Director

James Choi is a prolific, award-winning filmmaker with over a decade of film industry experience in Los Angeles having worked in representation, production and digital media.

As an independent producer, James has produced two feature films from first time directors that have premiered and won at South by Southwest. Grand Jury Award for Best Feature winner “Made in China” which was distributed by IFC Films and “Saint Frances” which won the Audience Award and Special Jury Prize and distributed by Oscilloscope.

James was selected as one of Newcity’s Film 50 – the leaders of Chicago’s film culture of 2018/19. Having been in the forefront of the micro independent film movement in the last decade, James has produced and directed numerous films that have screen widely all around the world, winning awards and receiving distribution.

James has a deep passion for independent films and constantly working to break new ground in our digital age.

Film Information


Director: James Choi
Country: USA
Language: English
Runtime: 16 min.
Rated: PG-13

Credits


Producer: James Choi, Denise Milan
Music: Clarice Assad

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Farfalle Bianche

Farfalle Bianche

WI / IL Short Slot 3


YES! Filmmaker(s) Attending for Q & A


Sat Feb 22, 2020 – 7:30 pm | Hendricks Arts Center
Sun Feb 23, 2020 – 12:00 pm | Hendricks Arts Center



Farfalle Bianche

Directed by Neil Brookshire
Documentary Short
USA | 4 min | 2017


A young woman, half Italian, half American, raised in both Italy and England, explores her intimate connection to rural America. (Italian with English subtitles)



Our personal connection to planet Earth is vital to our future as inhabitants of this big blue stone. Denise Milan’s work with stones serves as a great reminder of this important message and what can come from understanding this connection. EVERYONE has a story with the stones.

Farfalle Bianche - Poster

Farfalle Bianche - Neil Brookshire Neil Brookshire
Director

Neil has been an actor on both stage and film for over twenty years. He lives in Wisconsin.

Film Information


Director: Neil Brookshire
Country: USA
Language: English
Runtime: 4 min.
Rated: G

Credits


Producer: Neil Brookshire, Assya Dimova
Writer: Kaila Conley-Conversi
Key Cast: Kaila Conley-Conversi

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Go, Go, Boy!

Go Go, Boy!

WI / IL Short Slot 3


YES! Filmmaker(s) Attending for Q & A


Sat Feb 22, 2020 – 7:30 pm | Hendricks Arts Center
Sun Feb 23, 2020 – 12:00 pm | Hendricks Arts Center



Go Go, Boy!

Directed by Oriana Oppice
Narrative Short
USA | 6 min | 2019


Go Go, Boy! follows a black LGBTQ youth as he discovers his place in the world through his private world of dance.



Set in 1990, the film takes us into the world of Bobby, a young boy living in the middle of the WWF craze. Bobby’s brother is a wrestler, his best friend is into wrestling, all they watch on TV is wrestling… and so Bobby feels immense pressure to be huge like the wrestlers. Only, when Bobby looks at himself in the mirror, he doesn’t see a big strong guy. He sees a little guy who will likely never live up to those big, beefy standards. Bobby remembers he had found a flyer on the street with a different kind of man on it. The flyer said “Ladies Night with Dancing Thunder!” – whatever that means – and had a picture of a shirtless man on it who wasn’t big like the wrestlers, but looked like he was happy. Bobby looks in the mirror and starts to imitate the man on the flyer. Hand on hip, jazz hand in the air, he shifts his body into different poses. As he moves, he feels free and fluid… he is Dancing Thunder! The audience is transported into Bobby’s fantasy: floating across the stage effortlessly, he dances to his own beat. In this new world, he can be free of the wrestling ring’s ropes, free from society’s expectations of who he should be. Here, he is allowed to feel accepted, worthy, and fabulous. As his mother interrupts his dance session, he hops back into reality and back into bed, out of breath but smiling.

Using anamorphic lenses and a retro color scheme of dark yellows and browns, we transport the audience back in time to that all-familiar period as children when we start to see ourselves as fitting into a larger world, where our status, and how we fit in, becomes paramount.

Instead of traditional framing and angles, I placed extreme focus on Bobby by showing only his face – other bodies are shown below the neck, with the brief exception of his best friend (standing in for his peers) and his sister (standing in for a bully). This intensifies the pressure Bobby feels from others, and serves as a magnifying glass for his body. It reinforces the notion that bodies, bodies, bodies are all he can see right now. It also reminds us that though others are around us constantly, the decision to live our lives the way we want is uniquely within us. Directing the audience’s gaze solely on Bobby increases that pressure on him. That feeling of “everybody’s looking at me” is infantile and yet it follows many of us for our entire lives. I want Bobby to feel the audience’s gaze as he becomes more comfortable being himself. In the fantasy sequence, Bobby dances in a wrestling ring, which turns into his stage. During his dance, he escapes from the ring and continues to dance unrestrained until his mother interrupts him. Symbolically, Bobby is breaking free from peer pressure to look and be a certain way, and is now free to be who he wants to be. By choosing a dance sequence, we again leave traditional storytelling approaches and enter the ethereal world of dance, where anything can happen.

This project gets to the root question: are we creating a world for children in which they can flourish by being themselves? Through this film, I can create space for audiences to fall into Bobby’s private world. Even if it’s just for a few minutes, they can be alone with him, see the doubt and fear in his face, and perhaps feel empathy for that fearfulness we all felt as children. The audience can then transform into Bobby’s champions, and after viewing, go out into the world ready to stand up for any child. It is on us to nurture an environment for children that allows them to be whomever they want to be. They should not feel encumbered by society to look or feel or be a certain way. This film gives Bobby the chance many children never get – to be free and happy just the way they are. It’s said that people are afraid of what they don’t know, and that that is the root of bigotry. We are still hearing parents say, “My kid could never be gay,” or “I raised my son to be a man.” This film strips all of that away. After viewing the film, they will see a piece of themselves as a child, only this one doesn’t let society push him into a world of repression, anger, and fear. Bobby is the child we all wanted to be – the one who says I’m going to be me. He will compel audiences to create a free world for all children.

We are proud of our diverse team: Our star and cast are African American, and our writer, director, and producers include women and members of the LGBTQ community.

Go, Go, Boy! - Poster

Go, Go, Boy! - Oriana OppiceOriana Oppice
Director

Born in Sicily and raised in Chicago, Oriana is an award-winning independent film and commercial director, writer, producer, and actor based in Chicago. Her experience as an immigrant has influenced her work as she focuses on outsider characters and circumstances. She tells the stories of big things happening to little people, both in comedy and drama. She is committed to elevating the visibility of women in front of and behind the camera, and is the Director of Programming & Communications for Women in Film Chicago.

Film Information


Director: Oriana Oppice
Country: USA
Language: English
Runtime: 6 min.
Rated: PG-13

Credits


Producer: Oriana Oppice, Jane Barbara
Writer: John W. Bateman
Cinematography: Derek Cox
Editor: Aleksander Vasic

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Principal Cast

Punch Me

Punch Me

WI / IL Short Slot 3


YES! Filmmaker(s) Attending for Q & A


Sat Feb 22, 2020 – 7:30 pm | Hendricks Arts Center
Sun Feb 23, 2020 – 12:00 pm | Hendricks Arts Center



Punch Me

Directed by Tim Schwagel
Narrative Short
USA | 6 min | 2019


Two girls rob a gas station…poorly.

Hannah is down on her luck, and she turns to her old friend Sammy for help. Unfortunately, Sammy’s method isn’t really what she was expecting



Megan Marie Connolly and Claudia Krogmeier brought their individual styles to the table and blended them to make “Dear Frankie.” Megan Marie seeks to make audiences slightly uncomfortable in her emotional dramas that are never as simple as black or white. Claudia’s unique and experimental tastes help to push her projects to new heights. “Dear Frankie” was originally written as a domestic dispute culminating in a violent encounter between two women in their home, involving long takes and characters frozen in place. With Megan Marie’s personal experience on the subject matter, the film came together as a heartfelt piece about a corroded friendship and the halting nature of healing and acceptance. The global super 8 competition Straight 8 provided an excellent opportunity to bring this story to life through film, and a way in which to grow stronger in the art of pre-production and purposeful pacing of our story. Straight 8 challenges filmmakers to tell a story on a single cartridge of super 8 with no editing and no post production. After this challenging exercise, in which we were honored as Straight 8 finalists at the 71st Cannes Film Festival, we found that this personal, unique story had an extraordinary impact on audiences. Audiences can watch this film ten times and still learn something new during each screening. We decided to tweak the film to our liking and edited, colored, and sound designed our film. We are so excited to share this final, completed version of “Dear Frankie” for the first time with audiences worldwide.

Punch Me - Poster

Punch Me - Tim Schwagel

Tim Schwagel
Director

I’m a filmmaker based in Eau Claire WI and i’ve loved movies ever since my dad took me to see “Dinosaur” when i was three years old. Eau Claire doesn’t have a large film community, but it is strong and i feel lucky to be able to do what i love right in my home town.

Film Information


Director: Tim Schwagel
Country: USA
Language: English
Runtime: 6 min.
Rated: PG-13

Credits


Producer: Kyle Lehman
Writer: Tim Schwagel
Director of Photography: Nick Houchin

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Principal Cast

Stole Apes

Stolen Apes

WI / IL Short Slot 3


Sat Feb 22, 2020 – 7:30 pm | Hendricks Arts Center
Sun Feb 23, 2020 – 12:00 pm | Hendricks Arts Center



Stolen Apes

Directed by Colin Sytsma
Documentary Short
USA | 18 min | 2019


After a sting operation in Bangkok for two trafficked Orangutans leave those accountable with no consequence Daniel Stiles, a detective in the illegal wildlife trade, thinks of new ways to combat illegal great ape trafficking.



“We Were Hardly More Than Children” is a tale of trauma and friendship. Lena’s story is of the Cape Cod artist, Diane Messinger, whose paintings are throughout the piece. Diane’s paintings are the anger she doesn’t feel and the hurts she doesn’t remember.

Stole Apes - Poster

Stole Apes - Colin Sytsma

Colin Sytsma
Director

For the last eight years the focus of Colin Sytsma’s work has been documentary filmmaking that contributes to the universal good. While giving a platform to ordinary people who express a specific socio political concern his work strengthens community and informs audiences of actions and consequences at the ground level. Originally trained as an experimental storyteller and cinematographer at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee Peck School of the Arts his work has been shown on PBS, Al Jazeera, and in film festivals around the world. Colin co-directed the feature documentary From Mass to the Mountain, a story of one man’s journey of protecting rainforest and freshwater sheds in the neglected Eastern Panama. Right now Colin is the director of photography on the film When Claude Got Shot, an ITVS funded feature film following a horrific gun violence incident and its aftermath. Previous to the two feature films Colin produced Wisconsin’s Mining Standoff for the television show Fault Lines on Al Jazeera America and Al Jazeera English. Colin sits on the executive committee of the Milwaukee Filmmaker Alliance and is also a board member of the newly created Freeland Film Festival, which is based around the concept of a world free of human and wildlife trafficking. Colin’s vision is to create intimate and impactful storytelling that evokes empathy and incubates change for the greater good of our world.

Film Information


Director: Colin Sytsma
Country: USA
Language: English
Runtime: 18 min.
Rated: PG

Credits


Producer: Colin Sytsma
Writer: Colin Sytsma
Key Cast: Daniel Stiles, Allie Russo, Raha Moharrak, Stephan Ngulu

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Tuesday

Tuesday

WI / IL Short Slot 3


Sat Feb 22, 2020 – 7:30 pm | Hendricks Arts Center
Sun Feb 23, 2020 – 12:00 pm | Hendricks Arts Center



Tuesday

Directed by Caitlin Raether
Narrative Short
USA | 12 min | 2018


After escaping the compound where they were born and raised, Quinn and Arden return to the farmhouse their mother left. Interacting with things they have never seen before and dealing with the fear of survival, they discover what they mean to each other.



Set in 1990, the film takes us into the world of Bobby, a young boy living in the middle of the WWF craze. Bobby’s brother is a wrestler, his best friend is into wrestling, all they watch on TV is wrestling… and so Bobby feels immense pressure to be huge like the wrestlers. Only, when Bobby looks at himself in the mirror, he doesn’t see a big strong guy. He sees a little guy who will likely never live up to those big, beefy standards. Bobby remembers he had found a flyer on the street with a different kind of man on it. The flyer said “Ladies Night with Dancing Thunder!” – whatever that means – and had a picture of a shirtless man on it who wasn’t big like the wrestlers, but looked like he was happy. Bobby looks in the mirror and starts to imitate the man on the flyer. Hand on hip, jazz hand in the air, he shifts his body into different poses. As he moves, he feels free and fluid… he is Dancing Thunder! The audience is transported into Bobby’s fantasy: floating across the stage effortlessly, he dances to his own beat. In this new world, he can be free of the wrestling ring’s ropes, free from society’s expectations of who he should be. Here, he is allowed to feel accepted, worthy, and fabulous. As his mother interrupts his dance session, he hops back into reality and back into bed, out of breath but smiling.

Using anamorphic lenses and a retro color scheme of dark yellows and browns, we transport the audience back in time to that all-familiar period as children when we start to see ourselves as fitting into a larger world, where our status, and how we fit in, becomes paramount.

Instead of traditional framing and angles, I placed extreme focus on Bobby by showing only his face – other bodies are shown below the neck, with the brief exception of his best friend (standing in for his peers) and his sister (standing in for a bully). This intensifies the pressure Bobby feels from others, and serves as a magnifying glass for his body. It reinforces the notion that bodies, bodies, bodies are all he can see right now. It also reminds us that though others are around us constantly, the decision to live our lives the way we want is uniquely within us. Directing the audience’s gaze solely on Bobby increases that pressure on him. That feeling of “everybody’s looking at me” is infantile and yet it follows many of us for our entire lives. I want Bobby to feel the audience’s gaze as he becomes more comfortable being himself. In the fantasy sequence, Bobby dances in a wrestling ring, which turns into his stage. During his dance, he escapes from the ring and continues to dance unrestrained until his mother interrupts him. Symbolically, Bobby is breaking free from peer pressure to look and be a certain way, and is now free to be who he wants to be. By choosing a dance sequence, we again leave traditional storytelling approaches and enter the ethereal world of dance, where anything can happen.

This project gets to the root question: are we creating a world for children in which they can flourish by being themselves? Through this film, I can create space for audiences to fall into Bobby’s private world. Even if it’s just for a few minutes, they can be alone with him, see the doubt and fear in his face, and perhaps feel empathy for that fearfulness we all felt as children. The audience can then transform into Bobby’s champions, and after viewing, go out into the world ready to stand up for any child. It is on us to nurture an environment for children that allows them to be whomever they want to be. They should not feel encumbered by society to look or feel or be a certain way. This film gives Bobby the chance many children never get – to be free and happy just the way they are. It’s said that people are afraid of what they don’t know, and that that is the root of bigotry. We are still hearing parents say, “My kid could never be gay,” or “I raised my son to be a man.” This film strips all of that away. After viewing the film, they will see a piece of themselves as a child, only this one doesn’t let society push him into a world of repression, anger, and fear. Bobby is the child we all wanted to be – the one who says I’m going to be me. He will compel audiences to create a free world for all children.

We are proud of our diverse team: Our star and cast are African American, and our writer, director, and producers include women and members of the LGBTQ community.

Tuesday - Poster

Tuesday - Caitlin RaetherCaitlin Raether
Director

Tuesday is Caitlin Raether’s first film that was written, produced, directed, and edited by her. The short was a Senior Thesis for her BFA in Film/Video at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. Caitlin’s main goal for the story in Tuesday was to show true love between a brother and a sister by acts of liberation and sacrifice. Working in the setting of her small hometown of Shawano, Wisconsin, Caitlin included details within the production design that speak of her family. Many of the props and furniture were borrowed or built by family members and the old photos are of her Mother’s family on their farm.
Caitlin had a great team of cast and crew that truly helped make this film a reality. The group really bonded as they worked inside of a cold farmhouse for five days. The entire process was an important learning experience for Caitlin as a filmmaker and also as a person of faith:
“From the very beginning of the process, I gave everything to God and did everything through Him. There were constant and countless moments where His presence and intervention was clearly seen and felt. I learned that through God, anything is really possible, even making a movie. My only hope going forward is His continuing guidance and that those involved can also be witnesses to His greatness”.

Film Information


Director: Caitlin Raether
Country: USA
Language: English
Runtime: 12 min.
Rated: PG

Credits


Producer: Caitlin Raether
Writer: Caitlin Raether
Cinematography: Derek Schmitt
Music Composition: Graham Hartlaub

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Principal Cast

Will

Will

WI / IL Short Slot 3


YES! Filmmaker(s) Attending for Q & A


Sat Feb 22, 2020 – 7:30 pm | Hendricks Arts Center
Sun Feb 23, 2020 – 12:00 pm | Hendricks Arts Center



Will

Directed by Rick Rose
Narrative Short
USA | 15 min | 2019


WILL is a twenty five year long love story about one man’s journey to claim his rightful inheritance and pass it along to the man he loves. Little did he know though that sibling greed can be the biggest obstacle he has to face.



“A Missed Connection” began as a means to an end, that end being to direct something. The script was written in a matter of two weeks and was good to go. This was late 2012.

Years passed… Other projects either happened or went nowhere and “A Missed Connection” kept being put on the back-burner. But it never went away. It lingered with me. I couldn’t put my finger on what it was – now that it’s finished, I probably still can’t.

What was a means to an end ended up becoming a different challenge and risk. To end up making this film with everyone who collaborated is everything I could have dreamed of and then some.

I realize that the years it took to get it made were valuable – not just for the dedicated collaborators that came aboard, but in getting the script right. And the movie evolved even in the final frame during production.

I’m not sure I can say “A Missed Connection” will end up being my most personal film. But it is my most personal film so far.

Now it belongs to the audience.

Will - Poster

Rick Rose, Director | WillRick Rose
Director

Rick Rose is an Emmy award winning producer and director who has worked over two decades in television, stage and film. He is also a social activist and entrepreneur. His vast professional experience includes development, directing, writing and producing in cities he has lived in including New York City, Los Angeles, Milwaukee and Hannibal, Mo. During his 8 years in Shreveport, Rick owned and operated Twine on Line, voted Southern Hospitality’s Best Restaurant of the Year, managed Suddenlink Media overseeing advertising on cable networks as varied as HGTV, CNN, ESPN and BET and recently served as Community Engagement Manager at the Shreveport Times. Rick worked on community connections across Northwest Louisiana building out relationships with such wonderful organizations as Shreveport Opera, Symphony and Metropolitan Ballet, SRAC, Strand Theatre, Community Renewal and Foundation, United Way, Philadelphia Center, Providence House, RFC, Holy Angels, Susan G. Komen and Advocates for Youth Justice for whom he serves as a CASA, Mentor and a Member of the Board of Directors.

Over the last couple years, Rick directed and produced the short films KEEPING ON and THE ORTON EFFECT and the web series THE BURKE SISTERS in North Louisiana. Rick’s greatest professional accomplishment was overseeing all creative, production, web and social media elements for four concurrent television series: DISCOVER WISCONSIN, PACKER REPORT TV, AMERICA’S DAIRYLAND and INTO THE OUTDOORS while directing the documentary RICHARD BONG: AMERICA’S ACE OF ACE earning his team and him numerous awards including the EMMY AWARD for production achievements and performance excellence.

Prior to this, Rick had been Performing Arts Manager for Pentacle/Danceworks and Playwrights Horizons in New York, working directly with teams that moved stage productions of dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov to PBS and the off-Broadway production of the Pulitzer Prize-winning HEIDI CHRONICLES to Broadway. Rick was later hired by Warner Bros. Television in Los Angeles to oversee a myriad of talent including actors, producers, writers and composers, his first being the Olsen twins, Ashley and Mary Kate.

While in Los Angeles, Rick launched the Donald O’Connor (of SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN fame) Family Theatre in Burbank, California, serving as its Planning and Development Director for the life of that theatre. He was also co-creator and co-host of SOAPTIME, the first cable talk show devoted to daytime drama. Rick has been a freelance journalist, contributing to SOAP OPERA WEEKLY, SOAP OPERA UPDATE and DAYTIMERS magazines and continues to write for publications such as IN TOUCH, OK! Magazine and THE WORD IN SEASON, a devotional of the ELCA Church which is translated into 30 languages. He is also co-host of THE TWIST PODCAST along with longtime collaborator Mark McNease of NYC where he expresses himself openly about political and social issues affecting the world, something Rick is very passionate about. Rick was named as a 2016 HIV ADVOCATES TO WATCH by popular blogger, Mark S. King of MyFabulousDisease.com.

Rick is proud of his work with the Miss America Scholarship Program and has coached three state title holders in winning the Miss America crown. He has also trained a Miss Costa Rica, Miss Louisiana, and a first runner-up to Mrs. World, all of whom remain dear trusted friends of his and fellow community activists. Born, raised and educated in Wisconsin, Rick is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Beloit College, after starting his college career at Bennington College following his senior year of high school in Osaka, Japan. Fluent in Japanese, German and English (sometimes!), he is an active fighter for equality, children’s and women’s rights and against AIDS, addiction, abuse and cancer.

Film Information


Director: Rick Rose
Country: USA
Language: English
Runtime: 15 min.
Rated: PG-13

Credits


Producer: Rick Rose, Pamela Brown
Writer: Mark McNease
Cinematography: Brandon Keim
Editor: Eva Contis
Music: Tony DiMito

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Principal Cast